Art museums can be a welcome respite from holiday planning and celebrating. With many New York City galleries closing for the holidays, seeing museum exhibitions holds an extra charm. Following are our five museum exhibitions to put on your list for December.

1.  Morgan Library & Museum: “Dubuffet Drawings, 1935-1962”

“Dubuffet Drawings, 1935-1962” is the first museum retrospective of the French artist’s works on paper. The exhibition includes around 100 drawings from Jean Dubuffet’s most innovative decades along with rarely seen works borrowed from private and public collections in France and the United States. Known more for his paintings, Jean Dubuffet (1901–1985) shocked the art establishment by making art inspired by children’s drawings, graffiti, and the art of psychiatric patients. Rejecting conventional notions of beauty and good taste, Dubuffet asserted that invention and creativity could only be found outside traditional cultural channels.

By way of channeling the immediacy of the untrained and untutored, Dubuffet often turned to drawing for experimentation and exploration. Favorite subjects were mundane activities of everyday life but also looked to traditional genres such as portraiture, the female nude and the landscape as a way to subvert expectations through outrageous depictions.

The Morgan Library & Museum is located at 225 Madison Ave, New York, NY 10016. www.themorgan.org.

Click here for exhibition details.

2.  Whitney Museum: “Carmen Herrera: Lines of Sight”

Carmen Herrera: Lines of Sight” is the first museum exhibition in New York City in nearly two decades. Now in her nineties, "Lines of Sight" focusing on the years 1948 to 1978, the period during which Herrera developed her signature style, the show presents over 50 works including paintings, three-dimensional works and works on paper. The exhibition begins with a formative period for the Cuban-born artist following World War II when she lived in Paris and experimented with different modes of abstraction. Many of these works have never been displayed before in a museum.

A highlight of the exhibition are paintings from what Herrera considers to be her most important series, Blanco y Verde (1959–1971). These nine paintings illuminate the innovative way Herrera conceptualized her paintings as objects by using the physical structure of the canvas as a compositional tool and as a way to integrate the work to the surrounding environment. "Out of Sight" then proceeds chronically to present art from 1962 to 1978 and concludes by exhibiting four wooden sculptures and a series of seven vivid painting from her Days of the Week series by way of revealing Herrera’s continued experimentation with figure/ground relationships and the architectural underpinnings of many of her compositions.

The Whitney is located at 99 Gansevoort St, New York, NY 10014. www.whitney.org.

Click here to read a review of the exhibition. Click here for exhibition details.

3.  Guggenheim: “Agnes Martin”

October 7, 2016 through January 11, 2017

Agnes Martin” is likely to be the most serene exhibition in the New York City art museum scene. For over 40 years, Agnes Martin (1912–2004) created spare paintings composed only of grids and stripes. Focusing attention to the subtleties of line, surface, tone, and proportion, Martin varied these forms to generate a body of work impressive both in its intricacy and focus. Martin’s commitment to this minimalism was informed by a belief in the transformative power of art and to conjure “abstract emotions” of happiness, love and experiences of innocence, freedom, beauty and perfection.

"Agnes Martin" is the first comprehensive survey of her work in over two decades. The retrospective presents the full scope of Martin’s output from her biomorphic abstractions of the 1950s to her signature grid and stripe compositions and her final paintings.

To accommodate viewers wanting to see this popular show, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum is extending its holiday hours and will be open on Thursday, December 29, 2016, from 10 am to 5:45 pm.

The Guggenheim is located at 1071 5th Ave, New York, NY 10128. www.guggenheim.org.

Click here for exhibition details.

4.  Met Breuer: “Kerry James Marshall: Mastry”

 October 25, 2016 through January 29, 2017. 

"Kerry James Marshall: Mastry” is the largest museum retrospective to date of the work of American artist Kerry James Marshall (b. 1955). Featuring nearly 80 works—including 72 paintings—that span the artist's 35-year career, the exhibition reveals Marshall's art practice and trajectory as he explores a wide range of pictorial traditions while countering, through paintings, stereotypical representations of black people in society and adds a place for the black figure within the canon of Western painting.

Marshall is known for his large-scale narrative history paintings featuring black figures—defiant assertions of blackness in a medium in which African Americans have long been invisible—and his exploration of art history covers a broad temporal swath stretching from the Renaissance to 20th-century American abstraction. The exhibition occupies two floors of the museum, presented in chronological order along with a gallery of paintings selected by Marshall from the Whitney's collection that relate to his work.

The Met Breuer is located at 945 Madison Ave, New York, NY 10021. www.metmuseum.org/met-breuer..

Click here for exhibition details.

5. Whitney Museum: “Dreamlands: Immersive Cinema and Art, 1905-2016”

October 28, 2016 through February 5, 2017 

“Dreamlands: Immersive Cinema and Art, 1905-2016” highlights the ways artists have pushed the conventions of cinema—screen, projection, darkness—to create new experiences with the moving image. The most technologically complex project mounted in the Whitney’s new building so far, the show presents a wide range of moving image techniques from hand-painted film to the latest digital technologies. The works on view use color, touch, music, spectacle, light, and darkness to confound expectations, flattening space through animation and abstraction, or heightening the illusion of three dimensions.

“Dreamlands" spans over 100 years of works by American artists and filmmakers along with a handful of works of German cinema and art from the 1920s which influenced or connects with American art and film. The exhibition title refers to the science fiction writer H.P. Lovecraft’s alternate fictional dimension, whose terrain of cities, forests, mountains, and an underworld can be visited only through dreams. The works in "Dreamlands" were selected to connect different historical moments of cinematic experimentation to create a story that unfolds across a series of immersive spaces, according to the museum.

The Whitney Museum is located at 99 Gansevoort St, New York, NY 10014. www.whitney.org.

Click here for exhibition details.

.

Still from "Easternsports" by Alex Da Corte and Jayson Musson, 2014. Four-channel video, color, sound; 152 min., with four screens, neon, carpet, vinyl composition tile, metal folding chairs, artificial oranges, orange scent, and diffusers. Score by Devonté Hynes. Collection of the artists; courtesy David Risley Gallery, Copenhagen, and Salon 94, New York. © Alex Da Corte; image courtesy the artist.

Still from "Easternsports" by Alex Da Corte and Jayson Musson, 2014. Four-channel video, color, sound; 152 min., with four screens, neon, carpet, vinyl composition tile, metal folding chairs, artificial oranges, orange scent, and diffusers. Score by Devonté Hynes. Collection of the artists; courtesy David Risley Gallery, Copenhagen, and Salon 94, New York. © Alex Da Corte; image courtesy the artist.

.

________________________________

Copyright 2016 Hamptons Art Hub LLC. All rights reserved.

Don't miss a story!

We are on Social Networks

Comments are closed.

subscribe