When LongHouse Reserve opens its 2016 season with its Rites of Spring celebration on Saturday, April 30, 2016, it also ushers in the celebration of its 25th year and the unveiling of new sculpture along with its summer exhibition season. Twelve new sculptures will be installed across the 16-acre grounds and remain on view through October 8, 2016.

Also being unveiled during the Rites of Spring opening is the first exhibition of the season "Master Works", featuring a mix of furnishings and "art-in-craft media". The show is curated by LongHouse Reserve founder and designer Jack Lenor Larsen with LongHouse Reserve Associate Curator Wendy Van Deusen along with guest curators James Zemaitis and Sherri Donghia. Details of the exhibition will be unveiled at LongHouse's season opening, The Rites of Spring celebration. The exhibition will continue through July 16, 2016. The Rites of Spring will be held on Saturday, April 30, 2016 from 2 to 5 p.m. at LongHouse Reserve in East Hampton, N.Y.

The new sculpture installations join around 60 sculptures sited to compliment the immediate landscape and each other. Included are works of glass by Dale Chihuly, ceramics by Toshiko Takaezu and sculptures in bronzes by Miquel Barceló, Peter Voulkos, Lynda Benglis and Willem de Kooning. Also expect to find sculpture by Sol Lewitt, Alfonso Ossorio, Claus Bury, Yoko Ono, Pavel Opocensky and the iconic Fly’s Eye Dome by Buckminster Fuller.

New Sculpture Installations for 2016

Legs, 1969, by Larry Rivers

Larry Rivers (1923-2002) is considered to be both the godfather and grandfather of Pop Art, being among the first to meld non-objective, non-narrative art to objective and narrative abstraction. Andy Warhol was influenced by Rivers and considered Rivers’ unique persona as an influential ingredient in the development of Pop Art.

Legs, 1969, arriving at LongHouse for 2016 is the original sculpture Rivers made as part of the mixed media assemblage Forty Feet of Fashion that was commissioned to celebrate the opening of the Smith Haven Mall in Lake Grove, Long Island. After the work was disassembled and removed from the shopping mall, Legs received a new life installed in the front yard of Larry River's Southampton home, requiring guests to walk beneath them to reach the front door. After his death, the work was put into storage, according to the New York Times. In more recent times in The Hamptons, Legs, 1969, was installed at the entrance of Art Hamptons art fair in conjunction with an exhibition of River's art inside.

Rivers's more controversial set of Legs, whose legal embattlement centered on its installation outside the Sag Harbor home of art dealers Ruth Vered and Janet Lehr, were cast in 1994.

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"Legs" by Larry Rivers, 1969. Mixed media.

"Legs" by Larry Rivers, 1969. Mixed media.

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Green RE: Genesis/Lake Eden/Black Mountain by Neil Noland

Neil Noland (1924–2013) was born in Asheville, N.C., attended Black Mountain College and lived for a time in Paris and Madrid where he continued his studies under the G.I. Bill. Returning to the states, he eventually resided in Amagansett where he served as workshop director of Sculpture Sites on the Wilxox property on Abraham’s Path.

Noland considered his work on canvas and sculpture as an interchangeable surface for color that could appear flat in the picture plane and read as a physical presence defining shapes and form in his ceramics and sculpture. His sculpture at LongHouse, made of Corten steel, reflect his concerns and feature surfaces that bend and curve, creating subtle variations of color.

A younger brother of the painter Kenneth Noland, Neil Noland's sculpture was the subject of a 2015 solo show at the Pollock-Krasner House and Study Center in East Hampton, N.Y. Green RE: Genesis/Lake Eden/Black Mountain was installed on the museum's grounds as part of the exhibition.

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"Green RE: Genesis/Lake Eden/Black Mountain" by Neil Noland, 1985. Corten steel.

"Green RE: Genesis/Lake Eden/Black Mountain" by Neil Noland, 1985. Corten steel.

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Six Lines in a T II by George Rickey

The kinetic sculptures of George Rickey (1907-2002) are known in the way the artist described them: "useless machines" or works that are precise and operate efficiently like machines but are absence of practical function. Precisely calibrated, Rickey's reflective stainless steel marry sculptural elements that move independent of each other yet are united in reacting to the natural environment, moving with the winds and changing the unpredictable cast of light and shadow and elements in the natural environment where the sculptures are sited. At LongHouse, Six Lines in a T II, 1964-79, is installed in Peter's Pond, near the center of LongHouse.

The sculpture recalls Six Lines in a T, 1966-79, another early non-objective work by Rickey, that features six hand-crafted, reflective stainless steel blades attached to a horizontal scaffold welded to a thin vertical pole. When at rest, the canopy of lines are roughly parallel to the ground. When activated by even a slight breeze, the blades move in crisscrossing paths without ever touching. Six Lines in a T is installed at Storm King Art Center as part of a trio of sculptures creating a trajectory of Rickey's mature work, according to Storm King.

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"Six Lines in a T II" by George Rickey, 1964-79. Stainless steel.

"Six Lines in a T II" by George Rickey, 1964-79. Stainless steel.

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The Invisible by Enrique Martínez Celaya

Cuban-born artist Enrique Martínez Celaya (b. 1964) may be best known for his large-scale paintings made from tar and a variety of material. Working in a variety of media, including painting, photography, sculpture and installation and influenced by the writings of poets and philosophers, his work suggest brooding and deep feelings of loneliness, yearning and desire for connection. Martínez Celaya's sculptures are typically presented in contexts he calls “environments.” His works examine the complexities and mysteries of individual experiences and explore the question of authenticity when personal imperatives, social conditions and universal circumstances collide. An inventor, trained physicist, author and book publisher, Martínez Celaya's art is held in collections around the world. He is based in Los Angeles.

The Invisible at LongHouse features a single cast figure of what appears to be a child. Fists clenched in a posture that is slightly bowed, the figure faces a corner while standing in a base. This figure, or a similar one, has taken occupied center stage in other recent works but set in different environments. The Treasure of the Patient, 2015, placed a bronze figure inside a metal cage with five live birds. In Los Angeles, a bronze figure was surrounded by walls of shattered mirrors and a single suspended light bulb in the work The Invisible (or The Power of Forbearance), exhibited last year in a solo show at L.A. Louver.

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"The Invisible" by Enrique Martinez Celaya, 2015. Bronze in metal basin.

"The Invisible" by Enrique Martinez Celaya, 2015. Bronze in metal basin.

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The Arch of Life by Ilya and Emilia Kabakov

Born in Russia and now residing on the North Fork of Long Island, Ilya (b. 1933) and Emilia (b. 1945) create collaborative work that draw upon the intersection of the routine and the conceptual. The couple collaborates together and with environments to fuse elements of the everyday with the conceptual in their work. Their installations include The Strange City, a concept developed for the Grand Palais in 2014, and Ship of Tolerance, initially conceived and installed in Miami and timed to Art Basel Miami Week in 2011 and then traveled to eight cities.

The Arch of Life is intended to represent a fragment of an artistic ruin, from which only this segment remains, according to LongHouse. The sculptures, made of cement covered in paint (reminiscent of those from their homeland) represent a human head born from an egg, a frightened person wearing the mask of a lion, a person carrying a crate with a lighted lamp, an immigrant suspended over a fence, and a burdened individual in the state of exhaustion.

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"The Arch of Life" by Ilya and Emilia Kabakov, 2016. Aluminum.

"The Arch of Life" by Ilya and Emilia Kabakov, 2016. Aluminum.

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Would That I Wish For (Tall Totem) by Marko Remec

A conceptual sculptor living and working in New York City, Remec (b. 1958) is a graduate of Williams College and Stanford University’s Graduate School of Business where he received his MBA. Drawing upon his traditional upbringing and his 25-years on Wall Street, he is a keen observer of society, translating his firsthand knowledge into conceptual sculpture with wry humor and playful wit, according to LongHouse. In his most recent work, the Totem Series, Remec incorporates ready-made objects depicting the human condition into three-dimensional forms.

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"Would That I Wish For (Tall Totem)" by Marko Remec, 2016. Wood and acrylic steel convex dome mirrors.

"Would That I Wish For (Tall Totem)" by Marko Remec, 2016. Wood and acrylic steel convex dome mirrors.

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Tall Dango by Jun Kaneko, Untitled (Installation of 6 dangos in various sizes)

Emigrating from Japan in 1963, Jun Kaneko (b. 1942) began his state-side studies at the Chouinard Institute of Art. Under the guidance of Fred Marer he was drawn to sculptural ceramics. Influenced by Voulkos, Soldner, and Rothman during the height of the Contemporary Ceramics Movement, his body of work and influence grew, according to LongHouse. Kaneko has partnered with industrial facilities throughout his career to realize large-scale, hand-built sculptures. This includes Myths, Legends, and Truths at Millennium Park in Chicago.

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"Tall Dango" by Jun Kaneko, Untitled (Installation of 6 dangos in various sizes), 2013. Glazed ceramic.

"Tall Dango" by Jun Kaneko, Untitled (Installation of 6 dangos in various sizes), 2013. Glazed ceramic.

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BASIC FACTS: "Rites of Spring" takes place on April 30, 2016 from 2 to 5 p.m. The twelve new sculptures will remain on view at LongHouse through October 8, 2016. The images of the sculptures in this preview do not reflect their installation at LongHouse Reserve. The "Master Works" exhibition opens on April 30 and remains on view through July 16, 2016.

LongHouse Reserve is located at 133 Hands Creek Rd, East Hampton, NY 11937. www.longhouse.org.

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Copyright 2016 Hamptons Art Hub LLC. All rights reserved.

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