DISPATCH - MAY 21, 2013 (8:45 p.m.)

HAMPTONS, NY-

Hamptons Art Hub is pleased to welcome Sandra Hale Schulman as a new contributor of arts writing and coverage of the Hamptons art scene (and beyond). Her first story reported on the Frieze New York art fair when it alighted on Randall's Island in New York City. Her next story reveals "The Big Show" at Silas Marder Gallery in Bridgehampton, NY. Following afterwards is a story on the Jack Goldstein retrospective at The Jewish Museum in New York City.

Sandra Hale Schulman is an arts writer, author and film producer. She was born in Miami, grew up in Westchester and began interning at SoHo’s Holly Solomon Gallery and Metro Pictures in the 1980s, while earning her BFA at Sarah Lawrence College.

Within months of graduating, she co-founded Spiritual America, an experimental Lower East Side space conceived by artist Richard Prince. The first show exhibited one photo—Spiritual America by Prince—and was available for viewing by appointment only.

The gallery also exhibited early work by Jeff Koons, Walter Robinson and Cindy Sherman. A year after co-founding Spiritual America, Schulman helped start 303 Gallery with childhood friend Lisa Spellman.

A year later, Schulman moved to Miami Beach with her family. She was hired by the Tribune’s Sun-Sentinel newspaper to cover the art, music and nightlife scene emerging from Miami’s Art Deco District. Schulman went on to write for Billboard, Variety, Rolling Stone, Ocean Drive, Country Music Magazine, The New York Daily News and Entertainment Weekly.

In 2003, she founded Slink Productions to produce a tribute CD, book and documentary on the late folksinger Peter La Farge. Also released were a documentary on Karen Dalton and a music video featuring Floyd Red Crow Westerman and John Densmore (The Doors).

Part Cherokee, Schulman has become a spokesperson for Native American causes on TV and radio. Her research on La Farge led to a BMI/Woody Guthrie grant and co-curating a show at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian. The project has now been optioned for a feature film.

Before moving to the Hamptons, Schulman lived in California’s art-saturated community of Joshua Tree and published an arts weekly.

“After living in the Hamptons for three years now, I am thrilled to be a part of the Hamptons Art Hub as I felt there was a lack of daily, comprehensive coverage of the art scene,” said Schulman. “I have written about and worked with some of the most successful artists in the world that live out here but I also hope to uncover the next generation of artists.”

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  • Sequoyah

    I love reading inspiring stories of people who are immersed in art such as Sandra. I aspire to become a part of the art world one day where my art can become inspirational to all. 🙂

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